Gluten-free, Portland Local, Recipe Time, Sponsored Post

Salmon Risotto

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

While awfully high-maintenance, risotto is a deliciously filling comfort dish that can be added to without much degree of difficulty. Some of my favorite additions to risotto include broccoli, peas, fish, spinach, and fresh herbs. I thought I would share my base recipe with added veggies and fish – if cooking for guests, sometimes its best to keep things simple. This recipe with just herb and parmesan is lovely under a breast of chicken or grilled fish.

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

The recipe below was made with a local business’ mouth-watering, wild caught, Alaskan smoked salmon. Salt of the Surf (formerly Salt of the Sea), was started by Zane Luther, who spends much of his time on the water in Alaska, catching and processing Alaskan salmon and processing them in a contemporary fashion. All fish from Salt of the Surf are pressure bled, which means that right after the fish is caught, its head is removed and clean water is run through the system to push the blood out of the body as quickly as possible. The issue is, as the blood sits in the fish, it causes an increased rate of spoilage. Flushing the blood from the fish brings the product up to the next level in both taste and texture.

The moment I got this fish through my door I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it – risotto was my first trick–can you guess my second? I’ll be posting about that soon!

Interested in getting your hands on some of this beautiful product? For more information about Zane and his exceptional fish, you can like his Facebook page and order directly through him by calling 541-231-6835 or emailing him directly at Pressurebled@gmail.com.

Salmon Risotto Featuring Salt of the Surf Salmon

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

Ingredients

1 T Olive oil
4 T Butter, divided
1 Yellow onion, diced
4 c Hot chicken stock
1 1/2 c Arborio rice
1/2 c Dry white wine
1 1/2 c Peas (if frozen, thaw)
5 oz Salt of the Surf Smoked Salmon (Keta or Sockeye), sliced
4 T Curly parsley, chopped
1 c Parmesan cheese, grated

Method

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

Heat oil in a large cast iron pan. Add onion and keep moving, until translucent. Add butter and rice and stir consistently until you get a nutty smell from the rice (about 2 minutes)–avoid letting it brown! Then add wine, stirring until absorbed. Ladle in stock, one ladle-full at a time, being sure to keep the heat on and the rice moving. The key to great risotto is neither scorching nor water logging the rice.

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

Continue adding until fully incorporated, about 25-30 minutes. Check the rice–it should be tender not crunchy. If you run out of stock and you’re still not to the desired consistency, add water, similarly, one ladle at a time. When finished, fold in last 2 T of butter, peas, and parsley, then salmon and parmesan. Salt and pepper to taste.

Serves 4

Salmon Risotto Salt of the Surf | The Spicy Bee

 

What would you like in your risotto?

Beer, How-To

Having A Keg at Home

All There is to Know About Having a Keg at Home | The Spicy Bee

The household kegerator was what I’ll call a housewarming gift…to ourselves. We got one in time to hold our housewarming party (which was the reason for the keg purchase). Having a keg at home is kind of awesome–it’s cheaper than buying bottles, you always like what’s on tap, and you rarely run dry, which makes entertaining that much easier! To some extent, it’s a slippery slope–you have a keg, then you probably want a controlled environment to keep it good for a long time if you’re not going to drain it in one evening (for a party, obviously).

How to Store the Keg

A keg is typically purchased as a half a barrel, which equates to 124 pints or 15.5 gallons. The most common sizing for home beer storage is either a half barrel, a 50L, or a 1/6th barrel and will come with a sankey connector. If you home brew, you’re likely to be storing in a corny keg (5 gallon) and have ball- or pin-lock connectors as they are traditionally soda kegs. The most rudimentary setup for a keg is a large garbage bin filled with ice and a picnic tap (visions of college days are flooding back quickly aren’t they?). This system will pump air directly into the keg, causing the beer to go bad faster through oxidation. Here’s to getting through the keg in one night!

All There is to Know About Having a Keg at Home | The Spicy Bee

Traditionally, Kegs do best stored at 38-40°F (this is also serving temperature). With proper temperature control, it’s also a given to have a controlled CO2 system for the kegerator. Once connected, the CO2 should be set accordingly – this can vary based on style of beer and serving temperature. For example, a pale ale or IPA should be served around 38°F and 11-12psi. Small adjustments in the psi can be made based on personal taste or the serving system. In this format the beer can theoretically last months.

How Do You Know When You’re Out?

This was my second question to Ktams when we got our first keg, just about a year ago today (my first question was “how on earth are we going to drink all that?” The answer? With help!) Full kegs weigh approximately 150lb (2 man carry only please), which means that as you think you’ve made it to the 100 pint mark, try lifting the keg a bit–it will get surprisingly light! Then, one day not too long after that, it will foam out–hopefully you know what you’re replacing it with by that point! Here’s a quick list of what we’ve had to date:

At an average of $150 per keg, it equates to as little as $1.20 per pint. We keep a donation stein on top of the keg and have some very lovely friends who help contribute so that we can keep the great beer flowing for everyone.

Guess what’s starting to feel light again!? What’s next?

Baked, Dairy-free, Recipe Time, Vegetarian

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry & Blood Orange

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry and Blood Orange | The Spicy Bee

Olive oil muffins with cranberry and blood orange — seems like a silly concept at first, but these dairy free, dare I say healthy, fruity muffins are a lovely way to start the morning. One of my favorite additions to what originally was a standard olive oil muffin recipe is the Oregon Olive Mill at Red Ridge’s Blood Orange Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Due to flavor strength, I like to cut mine with a non-flavored extra virgin olive oil. If you love yourself some blood orange olive oil, you’re welcome to sub in more and go down to a 1/4 c standard olive oil.

Why wait? Bake yourself up some of these delicious little fruit muffins!

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry & Blood Orange

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 c All purpose flour
  • 2 t Baking powder
  • 1/2 t Salt
  • 1/3 c Sugar
  • 2 T Maple syrup (or honey)
  • 4 Large eggs
  • 2 t Lemon zest
  • 2 t Orange zest
  • 2 T Balsamic vinegar
  • 2 T Coconut or almond milk
  • 1/4 c EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil)
  • 1/2 c Blood orange olive oil from Oregon Olive Mill at Red Ridge
  • 2 T Butter (for greasing)
  • 1/2 c Dried Cranberries

Method

Preheat the oven to 350ºF and assemble your ingredients.

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry and Blood Orange | The Spicy Bee

In a small bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt, and set to the side. In the bowl of an electric mixer with a paddle attachment, beat the eggs, and incorporate sugar, syrup, and zests. Blend until fluffy; Add vinegar and milk slowly to the mixer, then add the oils. 2 T at a time, add in the dry ingredients to the mixer. As the batter comes together, grease the muffin pans and lightly dust with some extra flour if desired. You may prefer to use cupcake papers instead–this is acceptable practice, simply omit butter from recipe. Just before adding to the tins, fold most of the cranberries into the batter (I like to leave some extra for topping the muffins as pictured).

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry and Blood Orange | The Spicy Bee

Fill the muffin tins close to the top and place on upper central rack in oven. If you have OCD (or an old oven) be sure to rotate your muffins just over halfway through the baking process to ensure even browning. Bake for 18-22 minutes, until a toothpick comes out with but a few crumbs and the tops are golden brown on the edges. Remove the finished muffins from the oven and allow to cool in the pan for about 5 minutes before moving them to a cooling rack.

Enjoy with butter or just a fresh cup of tea. this recipe makes about 12 muffins.

Olive Oil Muffins with Cranberry and Blood Orange | The Spicy Bee

The muffins store well at room temperature in a sealed container for up to 5 days.

Do you have a favorite muffin recipe? Share in the comments :)